Part I  –  Chapter 1 – 2018

Bertha Lake

I mentioned in Post 11b that Charlie, one of my two main characters, insisted that the novel should both start and finish at Bertha Lake.

Bertha, in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta, is his favorite hike.

The lake holds both his happiest and his most horrific memories. 

The photo above is from the south end of the lake looking north.

≈≈≈

In 2011, the year he turned seventy, he almost died up ahead there on the right-hand side just before the end of the lake.

He’d been encouraged not to try going around it. So far, no one had been able to because of all the snow. But Charlie tried it anyway.

Just after he started out, it began to rain. And gradually that gentle rain turned into a downpour, which made the snow slopes quite unstable, and exceedingly dangerous.

But Bertha also gave him happy memories, including the one you just read about in Part I, Chapter 1.

Charlie also insisted that the novel be divided into thirteen parts, starting with Part XIII, Chapter 1, and ending with Part XIII, Chapter 1. His reason for insisting on the number thirteen is explained in Post 11b.

I didn’t really see a problem with that, so I said Yes. I’d already said No to him about a number of other things.

But then I changed my mind about starting with Part XIII, Chapter 1. I’m still ending with Part XIII. I’m OK with that. But I think I’ll just start with Part I, Chapter 1.

Charlie’s been somewhat preoccupied lately. Maybe he won’t notice.

Here are some other photos of Bertha Lake that Charlie took on his hike around it with Jillian:

The lake is named after Bertha Ekelund. Charlie really struggled, unsuccessfully, to find out exactly who she was, and what, if anything, she had to do with Joe Cosley.

I recently read a biography, though, Being Bertha: How a Wayward Woman Became a Local Legend, written by her great-niece, Fran Genereux. It would have answered all of Charlie’s questions, but, unfortunately, it wasn’t published until 2017.

≈≈≈

Note

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part I – Chapter 2 – 1996

Sunrise.

These are examples of presunrise shots that some of the club members had gone out early to capture. The ones who hadn’t left until seven o’clock would have to wait until the How-I-Got-This-Shot session at the next club meeting to see what they’d missed.

Sunrise.
Those presunrise blues and oranges and reds.

Usually, Charlie went out for the presunrise stuff, but not this morning. Definitely not this morning. And he was initially surprised that Bobby Jo had stayed behind, as well.

This sunrise is what Bobby Jo gave up so she could tell Charlie she’d like to become his friend.

Whatever, he’d thought. He was solely focused on keeping that sip of coffee down. He wondered if he should head back to his room, slowly, so he’d be closer to the bathroom.

That lackadaisical Whatever certainly changed, however, when he found out a month later what she’d meant by friend.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part I – Chapter 3 – 2006

Snowfall and deer

At Arnscourt Villas, we often have a dozen or more of these mule deer, as well as hares, and cottontail rabbits, and all kinds of birds, including Canada Geese honking overhead on their way to and from feeding in our local farmers’ fields. At times, it feels as if we’re living in a nature preserve. And we love it.

≈≈≈

Charlie enjoyed sitting at their kitchen table and looking out at the grove of trees on the other side of their back fence. In the fall, this tree, the closest tree, was his favorite.

Fall colors
This tree was also beautiful in the winter with its branches laden with snow.

In the front room, he loved watching the change of seasons from the comfort and safety of his big, red, reclining La-Z-Boy while sipping a cup of coffee.

Charlie often told BJ how thankful he was that she’d found Lethbridge, and especially Arnscourt Villas, when they decided to move from Saskatoon. All this beauty sans garage bands and barking dogs.

He couldn’t see how Orillia, Ontario, his first choice back then, could be any better than this. And when you add in the sweeping prairie skies? And the Rocky Mountains just to the west?  No question. None at all.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part I – Chapter 4 – 2007

Newborn fawn

This fawn is probably about four hours old, and it probably hasn’t moved since the doe left it there. But, as you’ll see below, it’s just about to start getting to know its new body.

≈≈≈

Charlie took this photo of their backyard just after they moved in and just before the condo association replaced that old wooden fence with a new high-tech, plastic one.

This is where Charlie and BJ spent so many of their mornings. The sand on the bricks is intentional, please note. He’s filling in the spaces.

One morning, just before lunch a year or two after they’d moved in, he looked out and immediately called BJ. Quietly.

Four hours old

When Charlie first saw the fawn, he thought it was a cat or a small dog. It was so little.

Apparently, a deer three houses down had had twins four hours earlier and had immediately separated them. She’d moved one of them to the base of this elm tree, to the side facing the house.

Charlie had never seen a newborn before. Nor had BJ.

And they were surprised at how often it yawned. BJ thought it might be exercising its new lungs to get them functioning properly.

And then the standing up and stretching, this time with no mom to coach it or support it.

The fawn really struggled, but getting up would be far easier than getting down. Getting down took several minutes and several face-plants. Sometimes it would just stand there, probably wondering what to do next.

It would lower its front end – face-plant. Then stand up. Then its back end. Then both at once. It was really quite funny, but quite painful, to watch.

However, in a couple days both fawns were fully mobile and romping around together. But never too far away from mom.

A mom and her fawn

That’s the new fence mentioned up above. BJ was disappointed at first that she couldn’t hang her big flower arrangements on it as she’d done with the old one.

Now she had to use hangers and much, much smaller flower baskets. Not quite the same. But then the new fence looked so much better.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part I – Chapter 7 – 2008

Grey Cup

Mea culpa. Really culpa.

I fully intended to go to Fox Valley and Maple Creek at the end of August 2018 and photograph those two towns and the nearby sand dunes, so I could add in the photos for this chapter.

I wanted you to see where Randy and Wayne lived before they left for university.

But way led on to way, and I didn’t get there. So now you’ll have to wait until August 2019 to see what the area looks like.

And I just realized that I have to post “Part I, Chapter 7” to my website before I upload The Parking Ticket to Kindle Select, which I hope to do in the next month or two, because if I don’t post it, it won’t be available for the novel’s “Table of Contents.”

It’ll be easy to update this post later on. I can just take out what’s here and add in the photos that I should have taken earlier. But it would be much more difficult to update the novel once it’s published.

So this is really a filler-post.

And I decided to include a photo of a horse’s ass, if I had one, to explain quite clearly how I felt about not getting the job done in the first place.

I have no good shots of a horse’s ass, however, but I happened upon the featured photo above. And since Grey Cup is tomorrow, way led on to way, once again, and I came up with the email below to go with the photo.

I actually did send this email to a few people.

≈≈≈

The email:

Subject: A Grey Cup Precognition

Here it is, folks!!!

The Calgary Stampeders’ starting quarterback, Bo Levi Mitchell, is setting up the perfect bootleg.

But then he looks over at Roan and says, “You gallop deep left just in case Ottawa blitzes the bootleg. And gallop this time, dammit. Don’t Ambles.”

Glenn

PS Markeith Ambles will likely be a starting receiver for Calgary.

UPDATE July 7, 2019

This is an even bigger mea culpa. Much bigger. I forgot about this “filler-post,” and I’ve included the Fox Valley and Maple Creek photos in Part XIII, Chapter 13. So, if you wish to see them, that’s where they are. Sorry about that.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

PART II – CHAPTER 5 – 2008

Cameron Creek

Charlie had decided he was going to begin working almost exclusively with HDR images. But at the moment, after Bonnie’s two phone calls, he just couldn’t face the rigors of HDRs, so he worked on some water images instead.

A couple weeks earlier, he’d spent much of the morning at Cameron Falls out in Waterton Lakes National Park.

He had lots of close-ups of various parts of the falls. Mostly, though, he’d worked with that little rock in the last three photos.

A bear had surprised him while he was photographing the falls by walking right past him about ten feet to his left. Fortunately, he hadn’t heard the bear coming, and because he was looking into his viewfinder, he hadn’t made eye contact with it.

Unfortunately, he had his camera set up to photograph the falls, so he was quite disappointed with his photos of the bear.

Charlie often wondered what might have happened if he had heard the bear coming and had turned and looked at it, given that eye contact is a sign of aggression.

The other place he enjoyed photographing water was among the rocks in Cameron Creek beside the McNeallys picnic spot on the Akamina Parkway.

But now it was Thursday morning, and he and BJ had to leave for Saskatoon.

Working with the Waterton photos had kept him occupied for most of the week and had given him periods of time when he didn’t think about Randy and Wayne at all.

With Randy’s service being tomorrow, however, and with Wayne’s being on Saturday, he was going to have to come to grips with the loss of the only two friends he’d ever had.

≈≈≈

Note

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part II – Chapter 11 – 1997

The storm

Randy was trying to look anywhere except at Jillian. He couldn’t believe what she’d just said.

He watched the gentle flames on the birch logs in the campfire.

He looked up at three kids who were pushing each other around on top of the Thumb, a twenty-five-foot-tall rock on the shoreline, most likely an erratic brought down to North Dakota from Canada by glacial ice.

He followed a pair of mature bald eagles floating in the thermals directly above the Thumb.

And he noticed the gathering storm clouds and the growing midday darkness.

He was doing anything to avoid making eye contact with Jillian. He could feel her watching him out of the corner of her eye.

He noticed that one of the two eagles often moved off by itself.

The bald eagle
An omen?

He wondered if he should be doing the same, but he was too curious. He wanted to know where all this was going.

He looked up at the Thumb again. One of the kids was pushing his friend dangerously close to the edge.

And he could feel the pressure of the impending storm.

And he noticed that the one eagle was moving even further away.

The bald eagle
The omen, if it was one, was beginning to shout.

Again, he wondered.

What she was suggesting seemed absolutely insane.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part III – Chapter 11 – 1970s

Canadas and Their Goslings

These are Canada Geese, on the off chance that there’s someone who has never seen one up close.

Canadas and Their Goslings
A happy pair with their newly-hatched brood

Normally, Canadas lay five to six eggs. Here we have seven goslings.

Saskatchewan is at the northern end of the Central Flyway for Canada Geese in North America, and Ducks Unlimited Canada is working especially hard to conserve their habitats southeast of Saskatoon, which, of course, makes Davidson, an hour southeast of Saskatoon, a prime area for hunting Canadas.

Limiting out in such areas is not unusual at all.

Gliding down into a slough in the wetlands near Davidson

Some examples of these habitats.

Jack and his two friends had just limited out on Canadas and were having a beer in Pauline’s Pub in Davidson when they came up with the idea of turning Jack’s empty storage shed into a pistol range.

He’d acquired the shed when he bought his father’s farm. And since he’d subsequently given up on farming, it was empty now.

The shed was two hundred feet long and sixty-five feet wide with walls ten inches thick and twelve feet high. All heavily reinforced with rebar.

This range is where Randy did his shooting every second Saturday.

Note: I intend to add a photo or two of Davidson in a few weeks to show the area that Jack preferred over living in Regina.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part IV – Chapter 5 – 2009

Typical Scenes on the Way to Waterton

Charlie spends as much time as he can out in Waterton Lakes National Park. He prefers photographing and hiking out there from mid-September until the snows melt in the spring.

There are no ticks during those months and very few tourists.

Here are some typical winter scenes he sees on his way out to the park.

And some scenes he sees as he turns onto Hwy. 5 and heads in toward the townsite.

Looking south across Emerald Bay.

The townsite itself.

Finally, it’s tourist and tick time in Waterton.

The townsite in summer seen from across the bay.

On the way into the townsite.

The drive out to the park from Lethbridge.

Actually, Charlie enjoys the drive out to the park so much that sometimes he doesn’t even make it all the way there.

He’s learned not to pass up a good photo op en route simply because he’s assuming the light in the park will be better.

≈≈≈

Note

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.

Part IV – Chapter 8 – 2009

The Twin Butte General Store

This is the General Store in Twin Butte where Charlie usually went for Mexican food after a day of hiking or photographing. And BJ loved the food there, as well.

≈≈≈

There are a couple towns along Hwy. 5 on the way from Lethbridge to Waterton Lakes National Park where Charlie often stops.

The biggest one is Cardston, population 3,600, which is an hour southwest of Lethbridge. Cardston is a very Mormon town. It was first settled by them in 1887, but even today, still about eighty percent of the residents are Mormon.

The temple, completed in 1923, was the first temple outside the U.S.

And, of course, there’s been an official ban on alcohol for the last 111 years. The ban was reaffirmed by a plebiscite in 2014. But visitors can buy a cup of tea or coffee, although the Mormons themselves don’t drink either.

In my novel, Charlie and BJ sometimes went to the Reddi-Mart in Cardston for some homemade ice cream. The Reddi-Mart they went to, which started out as The Red Roster, has recently become The Red Rooster again.

And then ten minutes west of Cardston is Leavitt, which you saw as a winter scene earlier in Part IV, Chapter 5. Leavitt was first called Buffalo Flats, but was later renamed in honor of Thomas Rowell Leavitt.

The first home was built there in 1893.

Leavitt
Looking west toward Leavitt

Charlie didn’t usually stop in Leavitt, but he certainly did in Mountain View, population ninety, ten minutes later.

He often went into The Barn Store for two humongous scoops of mint chip ice cream in a waffle cone.

The original name, Fish Creek, was changed to Mountain View in 1893.

Mountain View
Coming into Mountain View

And finally, the Waterton townsite with Charlie’s two favorite attractions.

First, The Big Scoop.

The Big Scoop in the Waterton townsite.
During the summer, those benches are filled, and lots of people are standing around. And smiling. The ice cream is that good.

And his second favorite, Wieners of Waterton.

Wieners of Waterton
The home of the Local Smokie, and lots of other things. Notice the Bear’s Hump reflected in the top windows of both Wieners and Cogs.

You may remember from Post 12b, I Want My Old Life Back, that Jack Kerouac told me I had to stop worrying so much about stuff like social media and copyright. He told me to take a week or two off.

Get on a bus,” he said, “and go to Chicago. Or hitchhike down to Frisco and see what Dean and Camille are doing. Or get totally pissed. Tequila’s really good for that.

“Or at least go out to Waterton, and photograph some sheep and bluebirds, and chow down a couple Local Smokies at Wieners.

“I’d offer you a margarita,” he said, “but I’m a little short of cash just now, and I’m almost out of tequila. And I definitely don’t have any Smokies.

“So I guess you’re on your own. But you’ve gotta stop worrying so much and working so hard.”

And as I said earlier, when you’re still an old hippie at heart, and you’re as addicted to Kerouac as I am, you definitely pay attention to what he tells you. In this case, I did, indeed, head out to Wieners.

But back to Charlie. He, too, loves Wieners, but The General Store in Twin Butte is where he invariably heads when he’s really hungry.

He always has the same. Two large enchiladas, one chicken and one beef, which come with a huge mound of tangy Spanish rice and an equally huge mound of refried beans. All for twelve dollars.

The Twin Butte General Store
Charlie often comes here after a day of hiking and photographing.

Charlie and BJ certainly loved immersing themselves in the glories of the park’s flowers, and waterfalls, and mountaintop vistas.

But given the temptations of the exquisite Mexican food, and the Local Smokies, and the big scoops of ice cream in waffle cones, obviously their many trips out to the park were never solely about what nature had to offer.

And as a bonus for Charlie, there would never be any ticks in The General Store, or in Wieners, or in The Big Scoop.

≈≈≈

Note

To enlarge a single photo in a post, click on it. To zoom in for details, click on it a second time.

Click on the first photo in groups of photos to start a slideshow.

To see one of those group shots at full size, click on it, then scroll down to its bottom right where it says, View full size. You can click on it a second time, if you wish, to zoom in for details.

≈≈≈

(© 2018 Glenn Christianson. All rights reserved.)

Return to the Post Index

But before returning to the Post Index, why not scroll down and leave a comment or a question? And you might also want to check the boxes for “Notify me of follow-up comments by email” and “Notify me of new posts by email.”

Thanks for visiting my website.